What Is A Flash Noseband Used For?

A: A flash is a thin strap attached at the center of a regular noseband (also called a cavesson) and secured under the horse’s chin.

It is supposed to stabilize the bit in his mouth and prevent him from crossing his jaw or putting his tongue over the bit—actions that allow him to evade its influence.

What is a drop noseband used for?

The drop noseband

Action: Prevents a horse opening his mouth to resist the contact, but has a more definite action than the Flash. Some horses respond well but others resent it. The low pressure point in front and pressure in the curb groove at the back is said by some to encourage a horse to lower his head.

How do you fit a flash noseband?

To adjust them correctly you need to start by having the cavesson adjusted so that the noseband sits 1-2 fingers below your horse’s cheekbone. Then adjust the flash strap so that is snug but so you can still fit two fingers under the horse’s jaw.

Can you use a flash noseband in dressage?

The most common nosebands used in the hunter/jumper, dressage and eventing disciplines are a plain or a crank, with or without a flash attachment, a drop noseband and a figure eight.

What is the purpose of a Cavesson?

If used properly, a cavesson is used to keep the horse from evading contact until the horse learns to be soft and supple. It is also valuable for young horses just learning to go “on the bit”, as it supports the jaw and helps the horse to relax its masseter muscle, and flex softly at the poll.

Why do horses wear a flash?

A: A flash is a thin strap attached at the center of a regular noseband (also called a cavesson) and secured under the horse’s chin. It is supposed to stabilize the bit in his mouth and prevent him from crossing his jaw or putting his tongue over the bit—actions that allow him to evade its influence.

Why do English bridles have Nosebands?

On western and other types of bridles, the noseband may be attached directly to the cheek pieces of the bridle. The purpose of the noseband, or cavesson, is simply to help keep the bridle on the horse.

How should a noseband fit?

Fitting the noseband higher will put pressure directly on a nerve bundle in the horse’s face which can cause the horse discomfort. When tightening the noseband you should be able to fit two fingers (stacked) under the front of the noseband. The cheek pieces attach to the crown and support the bit in the mouth.

Where should a noseband sit?

A cavesson noseband should be fitted about 2cm below the cheekbones with space to easily put your thumb underneath it when fastened, and the head and cheek straps should sit just in front of the bit cheeks otherwise the noseband may eventually tip down at the front.

How do you fit a drop noseband?

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Fitting the Bridle to Your Horse: Meredith Manor’s Tip of the Week

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The following Myler snaffles are now dressage legal, although hooks, the slots in the cheek rings that hold the bit off the horse’s tongue when pressure is not engaged, are not allowed under FEI/BD rules.

The pelham is not permitted in dressage at any level. The pelham is never legal for use in any western riding discipline, where either a snaffle bit or a curb bit is used.

New and Dressage Legal from Happy Mouth is the smooth straight bar loose ring. This style is also available in a full cheek. Please note that this style of bit has a very thick mouthpiece around 20mm. Care must be taken so that the bit is correctly fitted and the horse’s teeth and mouth are in good condition.